Fall 2020 Courses

This fall, we're continuing to make ICS courses available to students from anywhere in the world. This semester's courses will be delivered synchronously (meeting at designated times over Zoom teleconferencing), following an in-depth once-weekly seminar format. Below, you will find a list of all the courses on offer remotely this fall and links to full course descriptions and syllabi (as they become available throughout the summer).

If you are interested in taking an ICS course for credit and applying it to a program at another institution, you may contact our Registrar with questions on how best to do so. If you are a continuing learner or want to get a taste for what ICS courses are like, we have special discounts available for first-time ICS auditors and for ICS alumni. You can find more information on our fees page.


Quick Links 

Summer Courses
Details on intensive courses taking place through the end of the summer.

Fall Course List

A full list of Fall ICS courses and syllabi can be found here.

Programs
- MA/PHD
- MA-EL
- MWS-ART

Fees
Find information on course, registration, and program fees here.

Inquiries
For inquiries and to register, please email our Registrar Elizabet Aras  

FAQ
Frequently asked questions related to taking courses at ICS.



Mondays @ 8:00-11:00pm EST

Biblical Foundations
(ICS 1108/2108AC F20) 


This course will explore the Bible as the ongoing story of and for God and creation, paying special attention to the way in which God's story is intertwined with that of humanity and the world. In asking whether and in what way the Bible is also our story, we will attempt to identify which hermeneutical methods might help us discern its significance for present day life, including the academic enterprise... [more info here]





Tuesdays @ 10:00am-1:00pm EST

with Bob Sweetman 


This seminar examines that philosophical approach to the history of philosophy that travels under the name of “genealogy”. It does so in terms of selected texts of the tradition’s to major figures: its founder, Friederich Nietzsche and the presently ubiquitous Michel Foucault. It examines the role that genealogical study of the history of philosophy has in the philosophical construction of its practitioners and what they think is truly first and deepest in the history they so study... [more info here]





Wednesdays @ 10:00am-1:00pm EST

Hermeneutics and Deconstruction 
(ICS 120901/220901 F20)

with James Olthuis


Against the background of Heidegger's Being and Time, this seminar will contrast Gadamerian "Hermeneutics" and Derridean "Deconstruction." Attention will then focus on Derridean John D. Caputo's 2019 Cross and Cosmos as an exercise in reading-with as rabbi/poet... [more info here]







Thursdays @ 10:00am-1:00pm EST

The Aesthetics of Compassion
(ICS 120104/220104 F20)

with Rebekah Smick


The emotion of “pity” or “compassion” is at the heart of Athenian tragedy, the great forbear of Western tragic drama. Raising the problem of human pain and fragility in the face of circumstances potentially beyond human control, representations of human suffering have an undeniable metaphysical and, more particularly, theological dimension. We will investigate the place of compassion in Western philosophy and theology and the role that art and imagination has played in the stimulation of compassionate response... [more info here]




Thursdays @ 2:00-5:00pm EST

Facing the Darkness: The (Human) Nature of Evil 
(ICS 120801/220801 F20)

with Nik Ansell


We shall discuss the origin and nature of evil by engaging various biblical, theological, and anthropological resources. Topics will include lament literature (e.g. Job), idolatry and the demonic, original sin and the correlation between victim and agent, and the relationship between justice and mercy. The course will consist of seminars in which participants will engage key readings relevant to the practice of interdisciplinary theology... [more info here]





TBA - Synchronous/Asynchronous Format*













*Please note that this course will have both synchronous (meeting at designated times through Zoom) and asynchronous (Google Classroom forum engagement or assignments) aspects to its format.