Winter Courses

This term, we're continuing to make ICS courses available to students from anywhere in the world. Unless otherwise noted, the listed courses will be delivered synchronously (meeting at designated times over Zoom video conferencing), following an in-depth once-weekly seminar format. Please note that classes start the week of January 10 and that the latest possible date by which to register for W22 classes is January 14.

Below, you will find an alphabetical list of all the courses on offer remotely this winter and links to full course descriptions and syllabi (as they become available throughout the coming months). If you are interested in taking an ICS course for credit and applying it to a program at another institution, you may contact our Registrar with questions on how best to do so.

AUDITING DISCOUNT: If you are a continuing learner or want to get a taste for what ICS courses are like, first-time ICS auditors and ICS alums can take these courses for only $425 (registration included). You can find more information on this and all other fee options on our fees page.

Available Courses

Birthpangs of the New Creation: Judgment unto Salvation in the Book of Revelation

Birthpangs of the New Creation: Judgment unto Salvation in the Book of Revelation

(ICS 120404 / 220404 W22
ICT3736HS / ICT6736HS L0101)
Meeting Time TBD
with
Nik Ansell

In our culture, “apocalypse” typically refers to a cataclysmic, catastrophic ending, real or imagined. Often this meaning, in which fear eclipses hope, is traced back to the biblical tradition. But what if the book from which we derive the term, i.e. the “Apocalypse”—or “Revelation”—of John, refers less to the end of the world than to a transition between the two Ages? What if that transition is characterized as double-edged: as both “the death throes of the old world order” and “the birthpangs of the new creation”? Attentive to the nature of apocalyptic discourse, which typically also features an “open heaven” (or reconnection between the heavens and the earth) motif, this course will seek to develop a key area of systematic theology by exploring the topics of death, judgment, heaven, and hell—the ‘four last things’ of traditional eschatology—as they are portrayed in the book of Revelation.

In allowing intertextual and intratextual webs of meaning to emerge, we will pay special attention to the way in which Old Testament echoes, together with the book’s own symbolic coherence and narrative logic, can open up new avenues for exegesis, and for theological reflection. The topic of Final Judgment will be a special focus. How is this to be conceived in the light of the apocalyptic transition? If the first reference to Babylon in the biblical canon, the Babel narrative of Gen 11, refers to a judgment that does not bring history to an end but opens it up once again to the dissemination motif of Gen 1:28, is it possible to detect a parallel “judgment unto salvation” theme in the final book of the New Testament? Our discussions will explore the interface between biblical studies, the “theological interpretation of Scripture,” and contemporary eschatology. Familiarity with New Testament Greek is an advantage but is not a prerequisite... [more info here]

Deeper Learning: From Wonder to Inquiry to Practice

Deeper Learning: From Wonder to Inquiry to Practice

(ICSD 260004 W22)
Blended Online Synchronous / Asynchronous Format*
with
Edith van der Boom

This is a course for instructional leaders. It explores learning as a journey from wonder to inquiry to practice. This course seeks to help Christian educators develop Deeper Learning within the context of three areas: first, a celebration of the learner (what it means to be created in God’s image); second, a mindfulness towards intentional learning design, and third, a responsiveness to culture (how do we embody our mission in every aspect of school life and live it out in God’s world?). Students will also gain an understanding of global education and how it can inform one’s Deeper Learning pedagogy.... [more info here]

*Please note that this course will have both synchronous (meeting periodically at designated times through Zoom) and asynchronous (Google Classroom forum engagement or assignments) aspects to its format. Consult the course catalogue and syllabus for details about meetings and assignment expectations.

How to Govern a School: Board Governance, Decision-Making, and Community Engagement

How to Govern a School: Board Governance, Decision-Making, and Community Engagement

(ICS 260002 W22)
Blended Online Synchronous / Asynchronous Format*
with
Gideon Strauss

This is a course for new and aspiring principals, school leadership teams, and school boards. The course provides frameworks and tools for leadership in educational governance. The course also introduces participants to the work of nurturing the relationships among the school’s stakeholders, with a focus on the pivotal relationship between the board and the executive leadership team (or, in smaller schools, the principal). Different approaches to the work of the board are considered, with particular attention to the stewardship of the school’s vision, mission, and values, to the strategic formulation of policy and the monitoring of executive performance, and to accountability to the school’s parents and supporting community.... [more details here]

*Please note that this course will have both synchronous (meeting periodically at designated times through Zoom) and asynchronous (Google Classroom forum engagement or assignments) aspects to its format. Consult the course catalogue and syllabus for details about meetings and assignment expectations.

Individuality in the Franciscan Thought of John Duns Scotus and William of Ockham

Individuality in the Franciscan Thought of John Duns Scotus and William of Ockham

(ICS 120404 / 220404 W22
ICH5151HS L0101)
Meeting Time TBD
with
Bob Sweetman

This seminar will examine the doctrine of individuality developed by the Franciscan thinkers John Duns Scotus and William of Ockham and the configuration of their thought as one or another form of metaphysical “individualism.” It does so historically against the backdrop of both Franciscan spirituality and the contested “Aristotelianism” of their university environment. The seminar is both an illustration of the value in and a critical reappraisal of a problem-historical analysis of philosophy that centres upon philosophical accounts of our daily experience of both universality in the world (the fact that creatures come to us in kinds) and individuality (the fact that it is individual creatures that come to us in kinds)... [read more here]

Interdisciplinary Seminar: Colonization, Racial Identity, and What it Means to be Human


[More details coming soon]

Recognition or Refusal? Cultural Politics in a Colonial Canada

Recognition or Refusal? Cultural Politics in a Colonial Canada

(ICS 153301 / 253301 W22)
Meeting Time TBD
with Andrew Tebbutt

Canada is often described as a democratic, “multicultural” nation whose political institutions are able to recognize a diversity of cultural identities and expressions. However, a growing number of Indigenous thinkers and activists are arguing that the politics of recognition through which the Canadian state engages with Indigenous communities, even where it is not overtly violent, remains colonial in dictating the terms of dialogue, typically in culturally and economically assimilating ways. Such Indigenous thinkers argue that Canada’s colonial politics of recognition must be rejected or refused, and in this way present a challenge both to Canada’s open and accommodating self-imaginary and to the liberal notions of culture and cultural diversity that have shaped Canadian political thought. In this course, we will first explore the theoretical underpinnings of the idea of recognition in some of its classical philosophical explorations, and then trace the application of this idea in Canadian political theory. We will then assess the adequacy of a liberal politics of recognition for addressing Indigenous-settler relationships in Canada. Here, our guide will be Glen Sean Coulthard’s 2014 work Red Skin, White Masks: Rejecting the Colonial Politics of Recognition, which applies the work of anticolonial theorist Frantz Fanon to Canada’s interaction with Indigenous communities. Reading Coulthard’s work alongside other Indigenous authors such as Leanne Betasamosake Simpson and Taiaiake Alfred, we will explore the challenges involved in pursuing non-colonial forms of recognition, in relation to ideas such as freedom, rights, property, gender, and political speech. We will also explore how Indigenous authors and activists imagine alternative futures and practices of self-determination beyond the terms of Canadian nationalism... [more info here]

Religion, Life, and Society: Reformational Philosophy

Religion, Life, and Society: Reformational Philosophy

(ICS 1107AC / 2107AC W22
ICT3702HS / ICT6702HS L0101)
Meeting Time TBD
with
Bob Sweetman

An exploration of central issues in philosophy, as addressed by Herman Dooyeweerd, Dirk Vollenhoven, and the “Amsterdam School” of neoCalvinian thought. The course tests the relevance of this tradition for recent developments in Western philosophy. Special attention is given to critiques of foundationalism, metaphysics, and modernity within reformational philosophy and in other schools of thought... [more info here]

Want to join a course?

Please email our Registrar, Elizabet Aras, at academic-registrar@icscanada.edu with your questions or to register today!